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New £17,000, 50x more effective super-cameras to ‘threaten fleet jobs’

By Kyle Linsay
Friday, September 27, 2013 - 09:49

Comments (6)
SpeedCamera

FLASH: ‘Super-camera’ (not shown) rolled out

New £17,000 ‘super-cameras’ that can catch 50 times more motorists than conventional Gatso cameras could criminalise fleet drivers, a leading motor lawyer has warned.

Natali Farrell, of Just Motor Law, believes the ZenGrab LaneWatch Mk2 cameras will lead to thousands of convictions for minor offences such as momentarily parking on double-yellow lines while dropping off deliveries.

Her concerns come after it was revealed the new super-camera snapped more than 1,000 offences in just two weeks, compared to 271 over a whole year with the conventional Gatso camera.

The ZenGrab features two lenses and night visions, and councils across the country are already rolling them out.

Ms Farrell said: “The sheer fact that those who drive for work spend the vast majority of their week on the road means that they are already vulnerable when it comes to being caught for minor contraventions.

“These super-cameras, which are capable of documenting so many more offences, put drivers at even greater risk of being prosecuted, unaware that they are falling foul of the law.

“For most drivers these cameras will increase stress and driving pressure, but for those who drive for work purposes, the effect will be tenfold, as they will be painstakingly aware that a few wrong moves could lead to their licence being lost, putting their job in jeopardy as a result.”

Common driving offences that the ZenGrab can spot include entering a yellow box junction, making banned turns, driving in a bus lane, briefly stopping in a loading bay and passing a no-entry sign.

Image courtesy of David Bleasdale from England, with thanks.

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Comments

The comments are closed.

  • Fred Macdonald says...October 3, 2013 (12:58)

    I think the word persecuted should be substituted for prosecuted!

  • Dave Fairweather says...October 3, 2013 (12:05)

    The additional stress of worrying about getting caught on a camera lowers ones ability to drive safely and to current road conditions. The obsession by law enforcement and other groups is infantile. It completely misses the point – its bad driving that causes accidents, not just speed. Excess speed in the wrong place is bad driving, but doing 40 mph on a dual carriageway that has a 30 mph limit is not bad driving – its bad safety assessment.

  • Pingback - New £17,000, 50x more effective ‘su... - September 30, 2013 (10:13)
  • Adrian Briscoe says...September 30, 2013 (09:23)

    “Common driving offences that may lead to prosecution include entering a yellow box junction, making banned turns, driving in a bus lane, briefly stopping in a loading bay and passing a no-entry sign.”

    So these offences are acceptable and we should not enforce the law? I have a good idea, lets send the offenders on an ‘all-inclusive’ holiday to rehabilitate them in to being considerate members of society shall we?

    Lets not let the truth get in the way of a good story FleetPoint!

  • Matt says...September 29, 2013 (21:57)

    Incidentally Ms Farrel doesn’t seem to clued up on traffic legislation considering she’s a motor lawyer; these cameras operate under de-criminalised legislation which means no points on your license; making this article completely inaccurate. If they don’t impose any penalty points how can they threaten fleet jobs?! Another example of lazy journalism.

  • Matt says...September 29, 2013 (21:15)

    Nonsense, these cameras only catch inconsiderate drivers that flout the law; by driving in bus lanes or performing dangerous illegal u turns etc. What good is legislation without any enforcement. Once again the press have distorted the truth with regards to these cameras; they don’t enforce speed at all so how can they compare the Westminster trail results against Gatso speed cameras?? but hey why let the truth get in the way of a good story.